1. vintagenatgeographic:

Fairy terns, Midway Islands
National Geographic | September 1971

    vintagenatgeographic:

    Fairy terns, Midway Islands

    National Geographic | September 1971

    Reblogged from: vintagenatgeographic
  2. kia-kaha-winchesters:

    shogunofyellow:

    nature is rad

    These are the most stunning nature photos I have ever seen

    Reblogged from: stopshoutin-imnappin
  3. feelmysunshine:

detailsofpaintings:

Frederic Leighton, A Girl (detail)
19th  century

MY HEART.

    feelmysunshine:

    detailsofpaintings:

    Frederic Leighton, A Girl (detail)

    19th  century

    MY HEART.

    Reblogged from: walk-through-walls
  4. flashofgod:

Erwin Olaf, National Ballet of the Netherlands, 2011.
Erwin Olaf made this photograph for Vive La Danse, a high end dance magazine in honor of the 50th anniversary of Het Nationale Ballet (The Royal Dutch Ballet). The first issue was handed out to Queen Beatrix.

    flashofgod:

    Erwin Olaf, National Ballet of the Netherlands, 2011.

    Erwin Olaf made this photograph for Vive La Danse, a high end dance magazine in honor of the 50th anniversary of Het Nationale Ballet (The Royal Dutch Ballet). The first issue was handed out to Queen Beatrix.

    Reblogged from: flashofgod
  5. Reblogged from: rosarawr
  6. Y ou know it’s interesting, it used to make me very uncomfortable that people would come to conclusions about who I was, but now I just don’t care. It’s fucking fabulous. It’s not that I don’t care what people think, it’s that I know that it’s not there. I know I’m more understanding of who I am, and that brings me peace. It doesn’t bother me so much that people might come to a different conclusion because that’s what they’re supposed to do, they’re supposed to come to conclusions. They’re just meant to be open to the music and whatever their though process is after that is entirely their own and no business of mine.”

    Reblogged from: walk-through-walls
  7. thoughtsofablackgirl:

    lewreen:

    inlovewiththepractice:

    I heard this on the radio. Mike Brown was a kid who didn’t want to play football, even though he had the body for it. When asked why, he told his friends that he didn’t want to hit anybody.

    This is the child that they’re going to paint as a thug. 

    Make. This. Known.

    Wow.

    -Tie

    Reblogged from: stopshoutin-imnappin
  8. fight-with-the-unknown:

thatscienceguy:

As children we’re taught the process of a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, and the story normally goes along the lines of a hungry caterpillar eats and eats until it can eat no longer, then it hangs upside down and forms a chrysalis, from which a beautiful butterfly emerges.
But what actually happens inside the cocoon?
It’s actually quite surprising, the caterpillar does not merely change its body a bit and grow wings, no… It dissolves. Almost entirely. The caterpillar excretes an enzyme which decomposes all the tissues and fibres into basic organic material, leaving only a few ‘cell disks.’
These cell disks comprise all the different types of cells in an adult butterfly - its eyes, legs, wings, etc. The caterpillar is actually born with them but they just remain dormant until metamorphosis. 
Once all the caterpillars cells have been decomposed the adult cell disks then start to grow, using the organic materials left over, eventually forming the butterfly that emerges a few days later.

So they dissolve themselves and cone back to life?

    fight-with-the-unknown:

    thatscienceguy:

    As children we’re taught the process of a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, and the story normally goes along the lines of a hungry caterpillar eats and eats until it can eat no longer, then it hangs upside down and forms a chrysalis, from which a beautiful butterfly emerges.

    But what actually happens inside the cocoon?

    It’s actually quite surprising, the caterpillar does not merely change its body a bit and grow wings, no… It dissolves. Almost entirely. The caterpillar excretes an enzyme which decomposes all the tissues and fibres into basic organic material, leaving only a few ‘cell disks.’

    These cell disks comprise all the different types of cells in an adult butterfly - its eyes, legs, wings, etc. The caterpillar is actually born with them but they just remain dormant until metamorphosis. 

    Once all the caterpillars cells have been decomposed the adult cell disks then start to grow, using the organic materials left over, eventually forming the butterfly that emerges a few days later.

    So they dissolve themselves and cone back to life?

    Reblogged from: stopshoutin-imnappin
  9. a-l-ancien-regime:

"Purple tulips, white flowering prunus, narcissus and pink chrysanthemum" 19th Century (detail)  Pancrace Bessa (1772 – after 1836) French natural history artist. Oil on paper Private collection

    a-l-ancien-regime:

    "Purple tulips, white flowering prunus, narcissus and pink chrysanthemum" 19th Century (detail)
    Pancrace Bessa (1772 – after 1836) French natural history artist.

    Oil on paper
    Private collection

    Reblogged from: amarling
  10. warpaintwarpaint:

Photo by Nathanael Turner.

    warpaintwarpaint:

    Photo by Nathanael Turner.

    Reblogged from: warpaintwarpaint
  11. apicturesqueplace:

    wtf-sabrinaa:

    She gets it.

    image

    Reblogged from: kyliesparks27
  12. adrieldaniel:

    “I implore those who love me to love my solitude.”

    -Rainer Maria Rilke

    Reblogged from: walk-through-walls
  13. hplyrikz:

I can relate to this

    hplyrikz:

    I can relate to this

    Reblogged from: rosarawr
  14. smallspacesblog:

 Karlavagen76 
    Reblogged from: smallspacesblog
  15.  Lauren (Betty) Bacall, RIP xxx

    Reblogged from: bunnyhepburn
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